Liberating process

In my practice I use beeswax as a recurring material in both installations and painting. While in my studio I try to manipulate wax so that it becomes a material I can identify with, and give it an aesthetic form, outdoors, in the pubblic squares I try to make an instrument that people can use to observe themselves. I accompany people to perform rituals. For me, wax symbolises a process of awakening. From solid to liquid to gaseous, wax goes through an increase in heat, is shaken and put into a state of vibration until it expands.
Observing, drawing, talking and dissolving are stages of transition, similar to those that wax goes through, that I use in my installations. I take people on an intimate journey through difficult emotions in their lives until they dissolve. I also use water, food, plasteline, everyday materials that I transform into tools to access a world of self-observation.
Emotions, especially difficult ones, are like a sculptural material that we can observe and shape. An emotion has several dimensions, it can be heavy or light, open or closed, and it is up to us and our way of observing and filtering them that they acquire value.
Initially in my past works I aimed to create poetic images that were born from pain. Pain carries the memory of our past. Now I use pain to cross thresholds of resistance and perform moments of creative insight. I now collect not only documents of pain but physical works of art that people make in front of me with a simple gesture. For me, drawing is a tool that when applied to wax, and to the process of melting, besides being an exercise in form and craft, holds a strong destructive and liberating sense.